Combat

Every unit in the game has a combat strength of one.  There is no die rolling and no luck involved.  Units of equal power will always cause a standoff against each other.

In this case, the Turkish attack on the Austrians at Budapest will be strength one vs. one.  The result will be the status quo, a "bounce"

In this case, the Turkish attack on the Austrians at Budapest will be strength one vs. one. The result will be the status quo, a “bounce”

In this case, try to move into the other's province.  This would result in a standoff, not a trading of places.

In this case, both try to move into the other’s province. This would result in a standoff, not a trading of places.

Both armies attempted to move into Galacia.  This results in another one vs. one "bounce".  Both sides would remain in place, and Galacia would remain empty.

Both armies attempted to move into Galacia. This results in another one vs. one “bounce”. Both sides would remain in place, and Galacia would remain empty.

This will happen, even between allied units.  Here, Serbia and Romania bounce each other, and Budapest remains unoccupied.

This will happen, even between allied units. Here, Serbia and Romania bounce each other, and Budapest remains unoccupied.

Here three powers try to capture the same province with one unit each.  Like the previous example, no one would get the province.

Here three powers try to capture the same province with one unit each. Like the previous example, no one would get the province.

Unopposed Moves

This would NOT cause a standoff.  In this situation Turkey would move to Budapest, and Austria would move to Vienna.

This would NOT cause a standoff. In this situation Turkey would move to Budapest, and Austria would move to Vienna.

Breaking a Stalemate

Stalemates are broken by means of support. Here the Serbian army lends it support, and the Rumanian Turk army attacks Budapest at two strength to one.  This would "dislodge" the Austrians"

Stalemates are broken by means of support. Here the Serbian army lends it support, and the Rumanian Turk army attacks Budapest at two strength to one. This would “dislodge” the Austrians

This is NOT support! This would be one vs. one vs. one, and would result in the status quo.  This is the most usual rookie mistake in Diplomacy.

This is NOT support! This would be one vs. one vs. one, and would result in the status quo. This is the most common rookie mistake in Diplomacy.

Dislodged- What happens when you lose the battle

When a enemy attacks you with greater strength, your unit will be “dislodged” and forced to either retreat or disband.  If there is no place to retreat, your unit is destroyed.

The Austrian army in Budapest has been dislodged.  It must choose a province to retreat to, or else disband.  A unit may retreat to any unoccupied province, except of course the one from which it was attacked.

The Austrian army in Budapest has been dislodged. It must choose a province to retreat to, or else disband. A unit may retreat to any unoccupied province, except of course the one from which it was attacked.

Units can even retreat to provinces that are enemy controlled (colored)! As long as they are unoccupied.

The Austrian army in Bulgaria has been dislodged by the Turks. Because it is not a fleet, it cannot flee out to sea, and thus has no valid retreat moves.  The army is destroyed.

The Austrian army in Bulgaria has been dislodged by the Turks. Because it is not a fleet, it cannot flee out to sea, and thus has no valid retreat moves. The army is destroyed.

Likewise, this Austrian Fleet has nowhere to retreat, as it cannot move further inland.  If dislodged, it will be destroyed.

Likewise, this Austrian Fleet has nowhere to retreat, as it cannot move further inland. If dislodged, it will be destroyed.

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